Hew Locke: Here’s the Thing is the most comprehensive exhibition to date of work by British artist Hew Locke. Involving a wide range of media – painting, drawing, photography, sculpture and installation, including extensive use of collage and found objects – Locke explores the languages of colonial and post-colonial power, and the symbols through which different cultures assume and assert

Now, more than ever, Birmingham’s artistic community is thriving. Forward: New Art from Birmingham is a group exhibition, including work by artists living and working in this city, to highlight the depth and vitality of a wide range of practices. Taking place in Medicine, the old gallery space of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists, from which sprang the young

The Museum of Sex presents Punk Lust: Raw Provocation 1971-1985, a survey looking at the way Punk culture used the language of sexuality–both visually and lyrically–to transgress and defy, whether in the service of political provocation, raw desire, or just to break through the stifling gender norms and social expectations that punks refused to let define them. The exhibition is

A display of film and photographs by artist Rachel Maclean opens at the National Gallery where her themes of national identity will relate to the exhibition Landseer’s The Monarch of the Glen. While English artist Edwin Landseer created a romanticised view of the Scottish Highlands, Scottish artist Rachel Maclean uses nostalgic stereotypes to explore how we portray ourselves.

Artist and filmmaker Rachel Maclean will curate a major exhibition at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Too Cute! Sweet is about to get Sinister, opening on 26th January 2019. The artist known for her distinctive satirical films will examine the world of cuteness by curating works from the Arts Council Collection and Birmingham’s collection to reveal how objects and images

An exhibition featuring new work by Birmingham based artists Barbara Gibson and Mark Murphy opens at Argentea Gallery on January 10. Fertile Ground is always the first exhibition to start the New Year at the gallery and is dedicated to promoting the best artistic talent in the region. This year it presents the work of Barbara Gibson and Mark Murphy whose

Thursday 15 November 2018 –Marking the culmination of a year-long collaboration as Whitechapel Gallery’s Writer in Residence, this new project from artist, writer and filmmaker Sophia Al-Maria (b. 1983, US) draws on feminism and radical queer politics to consider themes of history and narrative. BCE presents two distinct creation myths side by side – one ancient, one new. In an ongoing

We are incredibly pleased to introduce to you Matt Chu, a mighty fine creative from our hometown of Coventry. This young illustrator is dropping incredible artworks that are loaded with colour, depth and a tone that reflects the flair of a fine artist but features a clear, illustrative style that's much more approachable and inline with today's creative movements. Matt

Can sound mobilise socio-political and physical change? Working across film, sound and performance, Greek-British artist Mikhail Karikis (b. 1975) adopts the children’s science fiction novel ‘The Iron Woman’ (1993) by British writer Ted Hughes (1930–98) as an ecofeminist parable in which communal listening and noise-making become tools to transform the world. In this story, a female superhero gifts children with a