Quick Answer: Do Adults Have Selective Mutism?

Can adults suffer from selective mutism?

Diagnosis in adults It’s possible for adults to overcome selective mutism, although they may continue to experience the psychological and practical effects of spending years without social interaction or not being able to reach their academic or occupational potential..

How can adults overcome selective mutism?

In order to reach this stage, behavioural therapies used in the treatment of selective mutism in both children and adults include:Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) … Desensitisation. … Shaping. … Positive and negative reinforcement. … Family therapy. … Medication for selective mutism.

Can PTSD cause selective mutism?

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with dissociative features has also been associated as a potential precursor of selective mutism. Although it is an uncommon explanation for selective mutism, several cases of children who experienced severe abuse and trauma fit the classification of selective mutism.

Can a teenager develop selective mutism?

Most affected children and adolescents function normally in other areas of their lives and are able to learn age appropriate skills despite not speaking in some important situations. Less than 1 % of the population has selective mutism. Girls and boys are both likely to develop this disorder.

What causes mutism in adults?

If speech occurs it is restricted to terse responses or monosyllables. Mutism is not uncommon in the older population. Since it is often caused by brain damage, mutism is considered a neurological disorder. However, it is also a psychological disorder and so can be more accurately termed a neuropsychological disorder.

Can selective mutism cause depression?

In the early teenage years, selective mutism is very often compounded by social anxiety disorder. By young adulthood, or earlier, many people with selective mutism will also experience depression and other anxiety disorders, including agoraphobia.

How do you help someone with selective mutism?

When interacting with a child with Selective Mutism, DO:Allow for warm-up time.Monitor the child’s body language.Talk “around” the child at first with focus on parents or siblings.Get down on the child’s level and focus on a prop.Ask choice and direct questions to the child with focus on the prop.More items…•

Is selective mutism inherited?

The majority of children with Selective Mutism have a genetic predisposition to anxiety. In other words, they have inherited a tendency to be anxious from one or more family members.

Is selective mutism on the autism spectrum?

Some people confuse selective mutism with autism, but it is important to know that they are not the same disorder. Autism and selective mutism may appear to be similar; when children with selective mutism feel anxious, they often react with a lack of eye contact, a blank expression, and a lack of verbal communication.

What triggers selective mutism?

There is no single known cause of selective mutism. Researchers are still learning about factors that can lead to selective mutism, such as: An anxiety disorder. Poor family relationships.

Is selective mutism a disability?

One disability not only hidden but most frequently overlooked is Selective Mutism. According to the SMart Center: “Selective Mutism is a complex childhood anxiety disorder characterized by a child’s inability to speak and communicate effectively in select social settings, such as school.

What age can selective mutism be diagnosed?

Parents typically start noticing signs of SM when a child is three or four years old. The disorder might not be diagnosed until she is school-aged, when her problems with speaking become more apparent.

Why can’t mutes talk?

In general, someone who is mute may be mute for one of several different reasons: organic, psychological, developmental/ neurological. For children, a lack of speech may be developmental, neurological, psychological, or due to a physical disability or a communication disorder.

Is selective mutism the same as social anxiety?

Selective mutism can be considered as a variant of social anxiety disorder because of the significant overlap in symptoms profile as well as treatment response.

Does selective mutism go away?

Selective mutism typically does not go away on its own, and in fact can lead to worsened anxiety and social difficulty if not addressed.

What are the symptoms of selective mutism?

Other symptoms of selective mutism can include the following:excessive shyness.social isolation.fear of embarrassment in front of a group.clinging to caregivers.temper tantrums.oppositional behavior.compulsive traits.negativity.

Who can treat selective mutism?

You can start by asking your pediatrician, child’s school, family or friends who they have had direct experience with or who they have heard is a good child therapist. You will want to find a child psychologist, psychiatrist or clinical social worker who specializes in the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders.

How is selective mutism diagnosed?

Testing for Selective MutismTalking with you about your child’s development and medical history.Having your child’s hearing screened.Seeing how well your child’s lips, jaw, and tongue move.Seeing how well your child understands what others say to him.More items…

Is there medication for selective mutism?

Despite limited evidence, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are used to reduce symptoms of selective mutism (SM) in children unresponsive to psychosocial interventions.